Your Local Feed Store

Your Local Feed Store

Posted by on Sep 20, 2016 in Blog, Featured |

If you’ve lived anywhere remotely close to a rural or agricultural area, chances are you’re lucky enough to have a local feed store, not a chain, a small business owned by a local family. I was inspired by Arrow Feed and Ranch to write a blog about this small town treasure. I’ve been helping with marketing for the last couple years and am happy to say, I’ve learned a lot about small towns, feed stores, and genuine people. Throughout the article, I’ve included testimonials given by Arrow customers. Arrow Feed will be celebrating 20 years in Granbury in 2017.   Meet owner and operator, Patti Shafer. She’s the loyal matriarch of the store and always has a solution to your ranching and farming needs.   It’s a family affair. You’re sure to find a Shafer somewhere in the store when you visit. Patti’s husband, Larry, is the tall gentleman that hardly every forgets a face and always thanks you for your business. Sarah, her husband, Patrick and her brother, Blake, along with both of Patti’s grandchildren all do their part to keep the business running.   “Always seems like that it’s a family thing complete with kids.” – R. Sims   Arrow Feed is everything you want in a local business. Customer service comes first, down to remembering the brands you like and loading your vehicle for you. They are adamant about carrying Texas made products from furniture to honey and soaps, to treats for your pets. Have a specific product you need, but they don’t carry it? Just tell Patti, she’ll order it for you. She keeps an entire wall in the store for special order products. “Always amazing service and knowledgeable employees!” – A. Blackwood “Great lawn and garden, as well as animal needs, that guy, Travis, is always helpful!!” – A. Roiz     Small town businesses seem to always have a special way of celebrating the holidays and Arrow Feed is no exception. Be on the look out for a giant hay roll scarecrow in the fall or Christmas tree display in December. “The folks at Arrow Feed & Ranch go the extra mile…You know the holiday season is upon us when you pass Arrow.” – D. Fethke       Arrow is a great local source for lawn and garden, as well as local produce. When you’re looking for help to get your garden started, they care and they’re knowledgeable. It’s so awesome to have that kind of resource right here in Hood County. “My favorite is when the vegetables arrive ready for garden planting. You always have great advice for the appropriate products for any lawn or garden issue.” – J. Narducci   Purchasing your seeds locally gives a greater chance they’ll grow well in this region. Patti always keeps these stocked, and lawn and garden man, Travis, is always prepared to answer any...

Read More

Arrow Feed #2 to Close Its Doors

Arrow Feed #2 to Close Its Doors

Posted by on Apr 29, 2016 in Blog, Featured |

Please join us in extending the best wishes for employee, Diana Brittain. After 14 years of caring for Arrow Feed #2 located off W. Pearl, Diana Brittain is moving on to the next chapter of her life. She is ready to focus on her involvement with the church, her family and spend time with her beloved horses. Her son, Patrick Thomas, will continue to manage our Hwy 377 location. Diana moved to Granbury in 1980. She and her husband, David, are very involved with the Paint Performance Horse Association. She also spends time organizing trail rides, teaching horseback riding and is an avid gardner. Her years of expertise in the field of agriculture has been invaluable to us and we hope for the very best for her new endeavors. As a team, we want to thank Diana for her many years of work and leadership. Her charm and dedication will always be remembered. Arrow Feed #2 will close its doors April 30, 2016. We will continue to serve you at the main store, 2031 E. Hwy 377,...

Read More

Hot Weather Tips for Raising Poultry

Hot Weather Tips for Raising Poultry

Posted by on Jul 18, 2013 in Blog, Featured |

They say raising poultry is all about feed, water, heat and light. But in the summer, beating the heat is a top priority. Severe heat stress can affect egg quality, size and hatchability. It can also increase the rate of mortality. Here are some tips: Keep Birds Cool Even free-range birds need access to shade. If there is none, create some. Ventilation is critical. Make sure nothing obstructs the flow of fresh air, and don’t allow ammonia to accumulate. Use a misting fan or fogging system in a well-ventilated area. Avoid unnecessary activity. Don’t disturb birds during the hottest time of day. Digestion generates body heat, so feed during the coolest hours. Water Is Essential Provide unlimited access to fresh, clean water. It’s essential. Position water containers in the shade. If water is too hot (or too cold) chickens won’t drink enough and egg production will suffer. Adjust waterers to shoulder height to help keep litter dry. Baby turkeys sometimes need extra coaxing to drink water. One trick is to put a few bright-colored marbles in their water. As they peck at the marbles, their beaks will slip into the water. Eventually, they’ll get the hang of it. (Remove marbles before birds get big enough to swallow them.) Grown ducks need access to water one or two inches deep in order to groom themselves. While swimming water is not a requirement, fresh drinking water is. Keep Water Clean If food, bedding or feces gets into drinking water, change the water. Ducklings and goslings love to play in water and will quickly soil it. Use a dispenser that allows only their bills to enter. Put distance between feed and water dispensers to prevent cross contamination. Germs multiply fast in summer heat. Disinfect incubators, feeders, water containers and other equipment regularly, particularly between broods. Signs of Trouble Heat-stressed birds consume less feed, so meat-type chickens (i.e., broilers) grow more slowly and hens produce fewer eggs. Birds don’t have sweat glands so they cool themselves by panting, which can alter their electrolyte balance. If you suspect heat stress, ask your veterinarian about adding electrolytes to water. Telltale signs of an unhealthy chicken: – less active than the rest of the flock – comb is pale and limp (the comb is a good barometer of health) – breast is concave and the keel bone becomes prominent – liquid diarrhea (versus a semisolid green and white splotch, which is normal) – unusual breathing or wheezing (some panting is normal in hot weather, but not to excess) If one of your chickens exhibits any of these symptoms, talk to your veterinarian. Keep in mind, birds experience a major moult (shedding feathers) in late summer, so don’t be surprised if they temporarily devote most of their calories to replacing their feathers and maintaining body temperature instead of producing eggs. Be sure to provide a good quality...

Read More

Cool Pet Tips for the Dog Days of Summer

Cool Pet Tips for the Dog Days of Summer

Posted by on Jul 18, 2013 in Blog, Featured |

Just like their human companions, dogs and cats enjoy the carefree and playful summer months. During the days when the temperature and humidity soar, you need to take special care to keep your pets safe and comfortable. Due to their limited ability to keep cool, pets can become overheated quickly. Overheating can result in heat exhaustion, heat stroke and even death. The following tips will aid in keeping your beloved companions happy and healthy throughout the summer months and help them “keep their cool” as the mercury rises. Never leave pets in a parked car in summer, even with windows partially open. The temperature inside a parked car rises very quickly and can kill a pet in less than 10 minutes! Avoid vigorous exercise during the heat of the day. Take dogs out in the early morning or evening hours when the heat is not so intense. Stop and let your dog drink often while exercising and remember, hot asphalt can seriously burn the pads of their feet. Pets that are older, overweight, long- or thick-coated and dogs with short muzzles are at great risk for overheating. They’ll be safest and happiest in an air-conditioned environment in hot weather. Outdoor pets should always have plenty of cool, fresh water to drink and a safe, shaded area to retreat to. Make sure water is kept in a tip-proof bowl. If possible, bring outside pets indoors on very hot or humid days. Signs of heat stroke or heat exhaustion may include heavy panting or drooling, unsteadiness, glazed eyes, rapid pulse, a deep red or purple tongue, vomiting and loss of consciousness. Seek veterinary care immediately. Your pet’s coat helps insulate him from the heat as well as protect against sunburn. Clipping or shaving pets too close in an effort to keep them cool can actually result in LESS protection. If you choose to give your pet a summer cut, keep it to a one-inch length and never shave down to the skin. If your dog isn’t on heartworm medication, have her tested, then put her on a prevention program. Mosquitoes, plentiful in summer, can carry heartworm larvae and infect your pet. Flea bites can cause severe itching and allergic reactions, and ingestion of fleas can result in tapeworms! Ticks carry diseases like Rocky Mountain spotted fever and can cause anemia. Your veterinarian can recommend a good flea and tick control program. Remember that pests are far easier to prevent than to get rid of. Always equip your pet with identification. I.D. tags are helpful but must be worn at all times. Tattoo or microchip methods are very effective in helping to recover lost pets. Keep lawn chemicals and automotive fluids out of reach of pets to prevent accidental poisoning. Taking simple precautions will go a long way in keeping your pet safe during the lazy days of...

Read More

Tips to Prevent Barn Fires

Tips to Prevent Barn Fires

Posted by on Jul 18, 2013 in Blog, Featured |

Just as in our homes, the same fire prevention awareness should be taken in barns to prevent loss of life and livelihood. The tips below can assist in preventing a fire. Use Agricultural Grade Exhaust Fans in The Barn: The number one cause of barn fires in the summer months is the use of a household box fan. These fans are not equipped with sealer motors, allowing dust and debris to get into the motor’s housing. When the motor heats up, they catch the small particles of typical barn dust on fire, melting the plastic which can result in a fire. They are also not properly equipped with heavy electrical covering around wire, which increases the risk of overheating. Good Housekeeping: Keep hay chaff swept up and out of passageways and doorways. Dust and fine debris can be a potential hazard. Rags, cobwebs and other peripherals can equally spread a fire throughout the barn rapidly. Hay Storage: When possible, store your hay in a separate building from your barn. Only accept cured hay. Heat generated in the curing process can ignite hay chaff. Clover and first-cutting alfalfa seem to particularly be slow in curing. The same concern applies to damp grain, wood shavings and saw dust. If you see slow rising smoke or smell smoke coming from these sensitive areas of the barn, call your fire department immediately! Keep All Electrical Devices in Good Proper Working Order: Be certain that all electrical outlets, light switches and cords are out of the reach of curious animals. By installing outlet covers and keeping all electrical receptacles covered at all times you can reduce the threat of electrical fires. Cover all wiring with metal conduit. This will protect it from corrosion or gnawing by common barn rodents such as rats and mice. Install Lightning Rods: The installation of lightning rods on your barn can reduce the risk of fire. Lightning can cause a fire by striking the roof or hay loft. These lightening strikes can cause a smoldering fire for hours before it breaks out into a devastating blaze! A safety inspection done periodically is a good idea! Be sure all equipment is kept in good working order to prevent risk due to failing or outdated...

Read More